Carson Research Consulting | Need to Measure Collaboration? We’ve Got a Tool for You
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Need to Measure Collaboration? We’ve Got a Tool for You

Collaborating is hard; measuring collaboration doesn’t always have to be.
 
We’re currently working with a client to do just that, among other things. A system-wide change initiative, located in California, this client’s work is aimed at helping a large number of agencies and organizations work together to reduce domestic violence. A primary goal of the initiative is to improve the ways in which the various, diverse partners work together. Measuring this type of change can be a challenge for evaluators. So for this project, we once again turned to the Wilder Collaboration Factors Inventory.
 
This tool, developed by the Amherst H. Wilder Foundation, measures 20 factors, backed by extensive research, that can help you to know whether and to what extent your collaborative is working well. It takes only about fifteen minutes to complete, so people can do it in person at a meeting, or you can email a link to stakeholders to have them fill out on their own. Best of all, the inventory is free, and the Wilder Foundation will score and interpret your results for you.
 
Go here to access the free online inventory.
Look here to read more about the inventory.
 
Not convinced about the evidence? Read the RAND study here.

Taj Carson
taj@carsonresearch.com

Taj C. Carson, Ph.D is the CEO of Carson Research Consulting in Baltimore, MD., Taj established her firm to provide clients with objective assessments of programmatic and organizational effectiveness and to give them the information they need to engage in more focused strategic planning. She has experience working with local, state and federal government, nonprofits organizations and foundations, focusing on the unique issues surrounding measurement and evaluation.

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